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L. Jay Guo | Faculty

L. Jay Guo

Professor: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Mechanical Engineering, Macromolecular Science and Engineering, Applied Physics

2304 Electrical Engineering Computer Science Building
guo@umich.edu
(734) 647-7718
Fax: (734) 763-9324

 

Profile Story

Falling into the world of engineering was not something Jay Guo had ever truly planned on, but, by some serendipitous coincidence, that's exactly where his professional path took him.

It all started with a piece of paper—benign and innocuous, though it may have been. A professor at the University of Minnesota, where Professor Guo was pursuing his PhD in Physics, dropped a flyer into the graduate student mailboxes seeking the help of a student researcher. The subject: quantum effect devices. Professor Guo took one look and knew he had to respond.

"[B]eing in engineering, you apply what you learn—some fundamental principles, either in physics, chemistry and so on. Hopefully, they're practical engineering applications that can have an impact on the people, on the society."
L. Jay Guo

"As a physics student, [the word] 'quantum' was fascinating," he recalls with a smile. "That's when I went to talk to [the professor], but he was in electrical engineering—and he persuaded me to switch from Physics to EE."

And that's exactly what happened. Guo transferred fields, captivated by engineering's ability to translate the theories of physics into practical, real-world applications.

"I learned [about] quantum physics in textbooks, but it was hard for me to imagine that you could actually build devices and utilize those effects."

Professor Guo excelled in electrical engineering ("it came naturally," he says), and he made his way to U-M in 1999 after working as a research associate at Princeton. Motivated by a desire to create and implement cutting-edge technologies, he pursued research dealing with what he calls "hot topics": nanotechnology and, more specifically, devices made by nanofabrication techniques.

The field of nanotechnology provides fertile ground for a bevy of engineering interests—from developing new display technologies, improving the efficacy and potency of ultrasounds and providing the military with science-fiction-level stealth possibilities—and it's constantly expanding. Professor Guo's work has been instrumental for many of these developments, and, although they may vary in subject matter, the common thread in all of them is to affect change.

Currently, his lab is involved in a multitude of projects, including nanomanufacturing technology, photovoltaics with new functionalities, and plasmonic nano-photonics.

"We are interested in new phenomena, new discoveries," he explains. "But, being in engineering, you apply what you learn—some fundamental principles, either in physics, chemistry and so on. Hopefully, they're practical engineering applications that can have an impact on the people, on the society."

Professor Guo knows the applications of his research could truly reshape not only how we create and power technology, but also how we interact with the world itself.

And it's all thanks to a simple sheet of paper, slipped carefully into a graduate student's mailbox.

 

Falling into the world of engineering was not something Jay Guo had ever truly planned on, but, by some serendipitous coincidence, that's exactly where his professional path took him.

 

It all started with a piece of paper—benign and innocuous, though it may have been. A professor at the University of Minnesota, where Professor Guo was pursuing his PhD in Physics, dropped a flyer into the graduate student mailboxes seeking the help of a student researcher. The subject: quantum effect devices. Professor Guo took one look and knew he had to respond.

 

"As a physics student, [the word] 'quantum' was fascinating," he recalls with a smile. "That's when I went to talk to [the professor], but he was in electrical engineering—and he persuaded me to switch from Physics to EE."

 

And that's exactly what happened. Guo transferred fields, captivated by engineering's ability to translate the theories of physics into practical, real-world applications.

 

"I learned [about] quantum physics in textbooks, but it was hard for me to imagine that you could actually build devices and utilize those effects."

 

Professor Guo excelled in electrical engineering ("it came naturally," he says), and he made his way to U-M in 1999 after working as a research associate at Princeton. Motivated by a desire to create and implement cutting-edge technologies, he pursued research dealing with what he calls "hot topics": nanotechnology and, more specifically, devices made by nanofabrication techniques.

 

The field of nanotechnology provides fertile ground for a bevy of engineering interests—from developing new display technologies, improving the efficacy and potency of ultrasounds to providing the military with science-fiction-level stealth possibilities—and it's constantly expanding. Professor Guo's work has been instrumental for many of these developments, and, although they may vary in subject matter, the common thread in all of them is to affect change.

 

Currently, his lab[LMC1] is involved in a multitude of projects, including nanomanufacturing technology, photovoltaics with new functionalities, and plasmonic nano-photonics.

 

"We are interested in new phenomena, new discoveries," he explains. "But, being in engineering, you apply what you learn—some fundamental principles, either in physics, chemistry and so on. Hopefully, they're practical engineering applications that can have an impact on the people, on the society."

 

Professor Guo knows the applications of his research could truly reshape not only how we create and power technology, but also how we interact with the world itself.

 

And it's all thanks to a simple sheet of paper, slipped carefully into a graduate student's mailbox.


[LMC1]Link to lab

L. Jay Guo

Falling into the world of engineering was not something Jay Guo had ever truly planned on, but, by some serendipitous coincidence, that's exactly where his professional path took him.

 

It all started with a piece of paper—benign and innocuous, though it may have been. A professor at the University of Minnesota, where Professor Guo was pursuing his PhD in Physics, dropped a flyer into the graduate student mailboxes seeking the help of a student researcher. The subject: quantum effect devices. Professor Guo took one look and knew he had to respond.

 

"As a physics student, [the word] 'quantum' was fascinating," he recalls with a smile. "That's when I went to talk to [the professor], but he was in electrical engineering—and he persuaded me to switch from Physics to EE."

 

And that's exactly what happened. Guo transferred fields, captivated by engineering's ability to translate the theories of physics into practical, real-world applications.

 

"I learned [about] quantum physics in textbooks, but it was hard for me to imagine that you could actually build devices and utilize those effects."

 

Professor Guo excelled in electrical engineering ("it came naturally," he says), and he made his way to U-M in 1999 after working as a research associate at Princeton. Motivated by a desire to create and implement cutting-edge technologies, he pursued research dealing with what he calls "hot topics": nanotechnology and, more specifically, devices made by nanofabrication techniques.

 

The field of nanotechnology provides fertile ground for a bevy of engineering interests—from developing new display technologies, improving the efficacy and potency of ultrasounds to providing the military with science-fiction-level stealth possibilities—and it's constantly expanding. Professor Guo's work has been instrumental for many of these developments, and, although they may vary in subject matter, the common thread in all of them is to affect change.

 

Currently, his lab is involved in a multitude of projects, including nanomanufacturing technology, photovoltaics with new functionalities, and plasmonic nano-photonics.

 

"We are interested in new phenomena, new discoveries," he explains. "But, being in engineering, you apply what you learn—some fundamental principles, either in physics, chemistry and so on. Hopefully, they're practical engineering applications that can have an impact on the people, on the society."

 

Professor Guo knows the applications of his research could truly reshape not only how we create and power technology, but also how we interact with the world itself.

 

And it's all thanks to a simple sheet of paper, slipped carefully into a graduate student's mailbox.

 

Short Bio

EDUCATION

University of Minnesota
PhD Electrical Engineering '97
MS Electrical Engineering '95

Nankai University
BS Physics Hon. '90

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

2011- Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Applied Physics, Macromolecular
Science & Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan

2005-2011 Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science
Associate Professor of Applied Physics Associate Professor of Macromolecular Science and Engineering

1999-2005 Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science
Assistant Professor of Macromolecular Science and Engineering (2000-2005)
Assistant Professor of Applied Physics (2001-2005)

1997-99 Research Associate, Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, NJ

RECENT PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES

  • Program or Steering Committee Member, the 5th, 7th, 8th  10th  and 12th  International Conference on Nanoimprint and Nanoprint Technology (NNT'09, NNT’10), 2009-2012.
  • Section Head (EIPBN 2005-present): Nanotechnology and Emerging Topics
  • Associate Editor, IEEE. J. Photovoltaics, 2011-present.
  • Program Committee Member (Photonics West 2005-now), SPIE conference on Nanotechnology.
  • Program  Committee  Member (Photonics  East  2006,  2007,  2008),  SPIE  conference  on  Optoelectronic devices.
  • International Advisory Board Member, 23rd  and 30rd  Conference of Photopolymer Science and Technology, Japan, 2006, 2013.
  • Symposium  Chair (MRS  Fall  2005  and  Spring  2007):  Flexible  and  Printed  Electronics,  Photonics,  and Biomaterials.
  • Program  Committee  Member (2005  International  Microprocesses  and  Nanotechnology  Conference,  Tokyo, Japan): Nanoimprint, nanoprint and emerging technologies
  • Keynote  speaker  at  the  30th Conference  of  Photopolymer  Science  and  Technology,  “Application  of Photopolymers in Continuous Roll-to-roll Nano- and Micro Patterning,” Chiba, Japan, June 26-28, 2012.
  • Invited speaker at Lester Eastman Conference on High Performance Devices (LEC’2010), “How small we can make semiconductor lasers?”, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, August 5, 2010
  • Invited speaker at Taiwan  Display  conference, “Patterning of conductive polymers and transparent metal electrodes for OTFT and OLED applications and related roll-to-roll processes,” Tainan, Taiwan, April 28-29, 2010
  • Invited speaker at Workshop on Synergies in NanoScale Manufacturing & Research “Continuous roll-to-roll nanopatterning as an approach to nanomanufacturing,” Ithaca, NY, January 27-29, 2010
  • Invited speaker at Printed Electronics 2009, "Large area Continuous Roll-to-roll Nanoimprinting and Dynamic NanoIscribing," San Francisco, CA, Dec. 1-4, 2009.
  • Invited speaker at Nanotech 2006 “Replication by Nanoimprint—from fabrication to device applications,” Boston, MA, May 7-11, 2006.
  • Invited speaker at the 23rd Conference of Photopolymer Science and Technology, “Room temperature and low pressure nanoimprinting based on cationic photopolymerization of novel epoxysilicone monomers,” Tokyo, Japan, June 21-24, 2005.
  • Keynote speaker at the 5th International Conference "Trends in NanoTechnology" (TNT2004), “Nanoimprint Technology and its applications,” Spain, Sept. 2004.

Research Interests

Nanofabrication technology, organic photovoltaics, polymer waveguide and surface plasmonic nanostructures with applications in biosensors and light sources, nanoimprint lithography with applications in polymer based electronic and photonic devices, nanofluidic devices and transport, silicon nanoelectronics.

Selected Publications

  • H. J. Park, T. Xu, J. Y. Lee, A. Ledbetter, and L. J. Guo, “Photonic Color Filters Integrated with Organic   Solar  Cells  for  Energy  Harvesting,”  ACS  Nano,  9,  7055–7060,  2011.  (Reported  by Technology Review, Laser Focused World, etc.)
  • H.-F. Shi, J. G. Ok, H. W. Baac, L. J. Guo, “Low density carbon nanotube forest as an index-matched and near  perfect absorption coating,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 99, 211103, 2011. (Reported by Science, Technology Review, BBC News, Popular Science, NY Times Syndicates, etc.)
  • H. J. Park, T. Xu, J. Y. Lee, A. Ledbetter, and L. J. Guo, “Photonic Color Filters Integrated with Organic   Solar  Cells  for  Energy  Harvesting,”  ACS  Nano,  9,  7055–7060,  2011.  (Reported  by Technology Review, Laser Focused World, etc.)
  • S.-L. Chen, T. Ling, and L. J. Guo, “Low-noise small size microring ultrasonic detectors for high- resolution photoacoustic imaging,” J. Biomed. Opt. 16(5), 056001 (6 pages), 2011.
  • T. Xu, Y.-K. Wu, and L. J. Guo, “Plasmonic nano-resonators for color filtering and spectral imaging,” Nat. Comm. 2010. doi: 10.1038 / ncomms1058 (Reported by Technology Review, R&D Magazine, Popular Science, Photonics Spectra, etc.)
  • M. G. Kang, T. Xu, H. J. Park, X. G. Luo, and L. J. Guo, “Efficiency Enhancement of Organic Solar Cells using Transparent Plasmonic Ag Nanowire Electrodes,” Adv. Mater. 22, 4378–4383, 2010.
  • H.  J.  Park,  M.  G.  Kang,  S.-H.  Ahn  and  L.  J.  Guo,  “Facile  route  to  polymer  solar  cells  with  optimum morphology applicable to roll-to-roll process,” Adv Mater, 22, E247-E253, 2010. (Reported by Technology Review.)
  • L. J. Cheng, and L. J. Guo, “Nanofluidic diodes,” Chem. Soc. Rev. 39, 923 – 938, 2010.
  • S.-H.  Ahn  and  L.  J.  Guo,  “Dynamic  Nanoinscribing  for  Continuous  and  Seamless  Metal  and  Polymer Nanogratings,” Nano Lett. 4392-4397, 2009. (Highlighted by Nature Photonics.)
  • S. H. Ahn, and L. J. Guo, “Large-area Roll-to-Roll and Roll-to-Plate Nanoimprint Lithography and analytical models for predicting residual layer thickness,” ACS Nano 3, 2304–2310, 2009. (Reported by Technology Review and ACS Podcast.)
  • M.-G. Kang, M.-S. Kim, J. Kim, and L. J. Guo, “Organic solar cells using nanoimprinted transparent metal electrode,” Adv. Mater. 20, 4408–4413, 2008.
  • B. D. Lucas, J. Kim, C. Chin and L. J. Guo, “Nanoimprint Lithography Based Approach fo r the Fabrication of Large-Area, Uniformly-Oriented Plasmonic Arrays”, Adv. Mater, 20, 1129–1134, 2008. (Reported by Mater. Today, and Mater. View.)
  • M.-G. Kang, and L. J. Guo, “Nanoimprinted Semi-Transparent Metal Electrode and its Application in OLED,” Adv. Mater. 19, 1391-1396, 2007. (Reported by MIT Technol. Review, and Laser Focus World.)
  • L. J. Guo, “Nanoimprint Lithography: Methods and Material Requirement,” Adv. Mater. 19, 495-513, 2007.