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Contact: Catharine June

ECE Communications Manager

Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

ECE Division

(734) 936-2965

3301 EECS

Abstract

Organic light emitting devices, or OLEDs, are very thin (nanometer) devices made primarily with carbon-containing dye compounds. They are extremely attractive due to their simplicity, flexibility, lightweight, and ultrahigh efficiency. Following their invention 30 years ago, OLEDs are now exploding into the marketplace, with prospects of ultimately replacing liquid crystal displays for mobile applications, virtual and augmented reality systems, as well as monitors and in televisions. Equally exciting is their imminent entry into the world of lighting. Yet before this revolutionary technology can dominate these applications, there are still several challenges that must be overcome. These challenges include improving their useful lifetime, improving light outcoupling using cost effective and simple methods, and finding very low cost and rapid methods to pattern very high resolution and low cost pixelated displays. While considerable progress has been made, there is much that remains to be discovered, engineered and implemented. This talk will focus on the “grand challenges” faced in perfecting OLED technology, and will provide a perspective about the future of display and lighting technology based on advances yet to come.

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Speaker Bio

Steve Forrest, Peter A. Franken Distinguished University Professor and Paul G. Goebel Professor of Engineering, is a professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Physics, and Materials Science and Engineering. He is director of the Optoelectronic Components and Materials Group. He and his group conduct research on photovoltaic cells, organic light emitting diodes, and lasers & optics. His investigations in these areas span decades, and have resulted in five startup companies, 302 issued patents, and key technologies that are pervasive in the marketplace. In addition, he has graduated 55 Ph.D. students. In 1985, Prof. Forrest joined the Electrical Engineering and Materials Science Departments at USC. In 1992, Prof. Forrest became the James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor of Electrical Engineering at Princeton University. He served as director of the National Center for Integrated Photonic Technology, and as Director of Princeton's Center for Photonics and Optoelectronic Materials (POEM), and from 1997-2001, he chaired Princeton’s Electrical Engineering Department. In 2006, he rejoined the University of Michigan as Vice President for Research, and returned to research and teaching full time in 2014. Prof. Forrest has authored ~565 papers in refereed journals, with an h-index of 146 and over 104,000 citations. Prof. Forrest is an elected member of the National Academy of Engineering, the National Academy of Sciences and National Academy of Inventors and a Fellow of the APS, IEEE, and OSA. He has received numerous additional distinctions throughout his career, including the IEEE/LEOS Distinguished Lecturer Award, the IPO National Distinguished Inventor Award (co-recipient), the Thomas Alva Edison Award, the MRS Medal, the IEEE/LEOS William Streifer Scientific Achievement Award, the Jan Rajchman Prize from the Society for Information Display, and the 2007 IEEE Daniel Nobel Award. Prof. Forrest has been honored by Princeton University establishing the Stephen R. Forrest Endowed Faculty Chair in Electrical Engineering in 2012. In 2016, Forrest received the IEEE Jun-ichi Nichizawa Medal for pioneering work in OLEDs. He is co-founder or founding participant in several companies, including Sensors Unlimited, Epitaxx, Inc., NanoFlex Power Corp. (OTC: OPVS), Universal Display Corp. (NASDAQ: OLED) and Apogee Photonics, Inc., and is currently on the Board of Directors of Applied Materials. He has also served from 2009-2012 as Chairman of the Board of Ann Arbor SPARK, the regional economic development organization, and serves on the Board of Governors of the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology. He was named the University of Michigan Distinguished University Innovator in 2015. Prof. Forrest is also Chairman of the Board of the University Musical Society.

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Article topics: MconneX , Light and Lasers , Organic LEDs