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About this video

Michigan Engineering professor Duncan Steel explains how quantum computing works, using quantum bits that take on superpositions of 0 and 1 simultaneously. Creating that relationship happens quickly, and in an unimaginably unstable environment. Steel's team is using lasers in an effort to get the information in and out of little pieces of semiconductor quantum dots.

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What are quantum computers going to do for us?

2/14/2014

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MconneX - U-M engineers are developing quantum computer technology that may have big implications for cyber security. But what exactly is a quantum computer, and will the technology ever make it into our laptops or smartphones?

MconneX - U-M engineers are developing quantum computer technology that may have big implications for cyber security. But what exactly is a quantum computer, and will the technology ever make it into our laptops or smartphones?

 


About the Professor

Duncan Steel, a Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Physics, Applied Physics and Biophysics. Photo: Joseph Xu, Michigan Engineering Communications & MarketingDuncan Steel is the Robert J. Hiller Professor of Engineering, and a Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Physics, Applied Physics and Biophysics at the University of Michigan. His research in the Quantum Optoelectronics Group focuses on the use of coherent optical interactions to study, control, and manipulate the quantum properties of semiconductor heterostructures.

Article topics: Computer Security , MconneX , Alumni


About Michigan Engineering: The University of Michigan College of Engineering is one of the top engineering schools in the country. Eight academic departments are ranked in the nation's top 10 -- some twice for different programs. Its research budget is one of the largest of any public university. Its faculty and students are making a difference at the frontiers of fields as diverse as nanotechnology, sustainability, healthcare, national security and robotics. They are involved in spacecraft missions across the solar system, and have developed partnerships with automotive industry leaders to transform transportation. Its entrepreneurial culture encourages faculty and students alike to move their innovations beyond the laboratory and into the real world to benefit society. Its alumni base of nearly 70,000 spans the globe.

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