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U-M researchers are working to create a sophisticated algorithm to create high-quality CT scans from a much lower dose of radiation. Currently, CT scans require a very high X-ray dose to create an image quality for doctors to examine a patient's organs. With this new computing algorithm, currently used only at U-M hospitals, engineering professor Jeffrey Fessler has greatly reduced the amount of radiation required to produce the same high-quality image.

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Lowering CT radiations

12/13/2012

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U-M researchers are working to create a sophisticated algorithm to create high-quality CT scans from a much lower dose of radiation. Currently, CT scans require a very high X-ray dose to create an image quality for doctors to examine a patient's organs. With this new computing algorithm, currently used only at U-M hospitals, engineering professor Jeffrey Fessler has greatly reduced the amount of radiation required to produce the same high-quality image.

Using a sophisticated algorithm, U-M researchers and engineering professor Jeffrey Fessler have greatly reduced the amount of radiation required to produce high-quality CT scan images.


About the Professor

Jeffrey Fessler, professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer ScienceABOUT THE PROFESSOR: Jeffrey Fessler is a professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science department at the University of Michigan. His research interests include medical imaging, tomography, nonparametric estimation, and inverse problems, with current and past projects in X-ray CT, MRI, PET, SPECT, radiation therapy, and image registration.

About Michigan Engineering: The University of Michigan College of Engineering is one of the top engineering schools in the country. Eight academic departments are ranked in the nation's top 10 -- some twice for different programs. Its research budget is one of the largest of any public university. Its faculty and students are making a difference at the frontiers of fields as diverse as nanotechnology, sustainability, healthcare, national security and robotics. They are involved in spacecraft missions across the solar system, and have developed partnerships with automotive industry leaders to transform transportation. Its entrepreneurial culture encourages faculty and students alike to move their innovations beyond the laboratory and into the real world to benefit society. Its alumni base of nearly 70,000 spans the globe.

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